Paddling Trips on the River

The Catawba Riverkeeper encourages everybody to get out and paddle on the River. We sponsor periodic family paddling trips on different sections of the Catawba River and its tributaries and we we have guided trips for youth throughout the summer. Come out and canoe or kayak with the Catawba Riverkeeper. In the alternative, get out and paddle on your own.

Tracy Tripp in KayakNational Whitewater Center web site).  If you are comfortable paddling on your own, but lack experience, we suggest starting on one of the lakes, or the 31-mile long "free flowing" section of the Catawba between Lake Wylie and Great Falls, South Carolina.  This section includes the world's largest grove of spider lilies, which bloom between mid-May and early June.  A map showing put-in and take-out locations on this section of the river is available on the Duke website at http://www.duke-energy.com/lakes/catawba-river-canoe-trail-map.asp?sec=content.

Some sections of the South Fork River and the Upper Catawba River Canoe and Kayak trail are also a great choice for beginning paddlers.  Even the most advanced paddler will find a challenge in the Wilson Creek Gorge, or during periodic recreational releases on the Great Falls of the Catawba.  Links to information about most of the places to paddle on the Catawba are included below.  PLEASE KEEP IN MIND THAT EVEN THE EASIEST SECTIONS OF THE RIVER CAN BE VERY DANGEROUS DURING PERIODS OF HIGH WATER FLOW. 

YKRE ParticipantsIt is strongly recommended that you check the release schedule for the dam above the section that you are paddling before starting the trip because water levels can increase quickly on the Catawba.  For example, if the release from Lake Wylie is 600 cubic feet per second (cfs) or less, the water may is probably too low for this section to be enjoyable, and if the release from Lake Wylie approaches 10,000 cfs, Class I rapids become transformed into Class III rapids suitable for experienced paddlers only. In general, flows of 3000 cfs to 3600 cfs are considered optimal.  

Information about scheduled releases and the impact on downstream flow is available at the following websites: 

 
You need to be the judge of what looks safe for your level of skill, but below Lake Wylie most people consider 3,000 cfs to 3,600 cfs to be about optimal.  At higher flow levels, we recommend using spray skirts and helmets.  Paddlers should always wear life jackets.
 

Bronwyn, Joan and Rick GaskinsThe Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation generally hosts guided paddling events open to the general public at least three times each year:  our Spider Lily Eco-Tour in late May or early June, a Fall Leaf Eco-Tour on Lake James, and early spring eco-tour.  Please watch our website for additional information about paddle trips.  Information about the Spider Lily Eco-Tour is at Spider Lily Eco-Tour.   Information about the Fall Leaf Tour is at Fall Leaf Tour.   Information about the Youth Kayak River Expedition program is available by clicking here

Information about Access Points and Trails

(organized from the lower part of the basin to the upper part of the basin):

    • Wateree River - Information about the Wateree River Blue Trail is at http://www.americanrivers.org/initiatives/blue-trails/projects/wateree.html.  There are large segments of this section of the River that have no public access and should not be undertaken without plenty of drinking water and supplies.  This section of the River generally is very flat.
    • Lake Wateree (flat water) - Lake Wateree is a popular lake for power boats and it can be very busy on the weekends.  Most paddlers prefer to paddle the upper section of the lake (where you can see glimpses of the old canal system from the early 1800s) or the numerous coves which often have stumps that make it difficult for power boats to access.  http://www.duke-energy.com/lakes/facts-and-maps/lake-wateree.asp
    • Great Falls and Rock Creek Reservoirs (flat water) - These are small reservoirs that are excellent for fishing and flat water paddling during normal conditions.  However, after a large rain, these reservoirs can become a raging river.  The Stumpy Pond area of the Rocky Creek Reservoir is a particularly popular and scenic area for paddling, which is accessed from the Stumpy Pond Access area off of Hwy 97.  http://www.duke-energy.com/pdfs/greatfallsrockycreek.pdf.
    • Great Falls Flow Study TripGreat Falls of the Catawba  (white water) - The Great Falls of the Catawba were considered a natural wonder by the early explorers of the Catawba basin, but were largely forgotten after this section was dewatered by the construction of dams.  As part of the relicensing agreement worked out in 2008, Duke agreed to put water through the Great Falls section of the River.  The recreational flow schedule is published by Duke Energy each year on its website. Paddling this section is extremely hazardous due to the amount of vegetation that has grown up in the river channel and the steep drop. 
    • Fishing Creek Reservoir (flat water) - This is one of the smaller, narrower lakes on the Catawba River and is generally very pleasant for flat water paddling, particularly the upper section between Hwy 9 and the Cane Creek Access Area - http://www.dukeenergy.com/pdfs/fishingcreek.pdf.
    • Lower Catawba River (Lake Wylie to Fishing Creek Reservoir) (partial whitewater - class II or easier under normal conditions)  - This 31-mile long section of "free-flowing" river has been designated as a scenic river and it is one of the best sections of the River for novice paddlers under normal conditions.  The access area below the Lake Wylie Dam is only about 15 minutes from Charlotte.

Note - If the release from Lake Wylie is 2,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) or less, the water may be too low for this section to be enjoyable.  If the release from Lake Wylie approaches 11,000 cfs, Class I rapids become transformed into Class III rapids suitable for experienced paddlers only.  3,000 cfs to 4,000 cfs is about right for most paddlers.  However, you need to be the judge of what looks safe for you.  Real time river flow data for the section below Lake Wylie Dam is available at the USGS website:
      • Catawba River Trail from Lake Wylie to Landsford Canal - The preceding link will take you to a description of access points and points of interest on the 31-mile long "free-flowing" section of the Catawba below Lake Wylie.  
        • The first section from the Lake Wylie dam to River Park in Rock Hill is about 6 miles long.  You can make this slightly shorter by getting out at the new access area at Riverwalk in Rock Hill.  This is a very nice paddle after work on a summer evening.  (A trip report on a very long day trip from Lake Wylie to Landsford Canal is at http://www.paddling.net/places/showReport.html?2361
        • The next section from River Park to Landsford Canal State Park is about 18 miles long.  This is a great section to paddle, but allow plenty of time.  It takes you through the Catawba Indian Reservation.  There is a public access point on the reservation, but the access is difficult and not well marked.  A recent trip report is at http://www.paddling.net/places/showReport.html?3071
        • The short section between access points in Landsford Canal State Park is about 1 mile long.  This section in takes about 2 hours to paddle (if you take time to enjoy the scenery) and takes you through the rare Catawba River Spider Lilies (which bloom during May and early June) and some sections of the historic Landsford Canal.   Pay attention to the orange tape marking the side channel that leads to the take-out or you will find yourself with a long, unanticipated paddle to the Hwy 9 bridge.
        • The final section, from Landsford Canal State Park to the Hwy. 9 bridge access is about 7.4 miles long.  A recent trip report is at http://www.paddling.net/places/showReport.html?3452.  Additional information is at http://www.sctrails.net/trails/alltrails/watertrails/CatawbaRiver.html.
        • Another fun paddle is to go downstream from the Hwy 9 bridge and then up Cane Creek or continue downstream to the access area in Fishing Creek Reservoir (approximately 10 miles).
      • Other paddling information

    Video of Paddling Trips

    Are you wondering what the water is like on the Catawba?   To check out video of paddling trips to see if it looks like it fits your abilities, CLICK HERE.

     Wilson Creek (appropriate for expert paddlers only)

     

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    Tell your Riverkeeper if you see:

    • Sewage Overflows
    • Failure to control sediment from construction sites
    • Illegal clearing of buffer areas
    • Fish kills 
    • Unpermitted discharges
    • Other issues that concern you

    Click here to fill out a pollution report or to report water pollution to Catawba Riverkeeper by phone, call 1-888-679-9494 or 704-679-9494.  In addition, to informing your Riverkeeper, you should also report spills or contamination to federal, state and local environmental officials.

    To report South Carolina water pollution call 1-888-481-0125.

    To report North Carolina spills or fish kills, call your local regional Department of Environment & Natural Resources office during normal business hours (704-663-1699 for most Catawba basin areas or (828) 296-4500 for Burke, Caldwell, McDowell and other mountain counties) or 800-858-0368 after hours.  (For more information on NC spill reporting, click here)

    Alliances

    The Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation is a proud member of EarthShare North Carolina, the North Carolina Conservation Network, River Network and the Waterkeeper Alliance.  

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